Wednesday, August 30, 2017

Modern Warsaw









If you have looked at my last two posts showing photos of Warsaw's Old Town, you will see quite a contrast between those photos and the ones here. Before World War II, Warsaw was believed to be one of the most beautiful cities in the world. The war left over 85% of the city in ruins. After the war was over, the conquering Soviets set up a communist regime and began rebuilding the city with large housing projects and other typical buildings of an Eastern Bloc city. One of the most prominent buildings built during this era was a gift from the Soviet Union called the Palace of Culture and Science, which is the large older building with the clock tower seen in my first photo. It is the tallest building in Poland and the eighth tallest building in the European Union. It was originally known as the Joseph Stalin Palace of Culture and Science until his name was eventually removed. Notice the modern downtown buildings next to it. These buildings were built after 1989 and the fall of communism. In the second to the last photo, you can see the National Stadium. It has a retractable roof and is home to Poland's national football team. The last photo shows St. Alexander's Church located on Three Crosses Square, which was a few blocks from our hotel. This church was originally built in 1825, but was also destroyed during the war and rebuilt afterwards.

19 comments:

Adam said...

Yeah you can tell which ones were Soviet-backed and which ones weren't. Makes you wonder how long it will be until they all are replaced?

Francisco Manuel Carrajola Oliveira said...

Gosto destes olhares fotográficos urbanos.
Um abraço e boa semana.

Andarilhar
Dedais de Francisco e Idalisa
Livros-Autografados

biebkriebels said...

I noticed all those Eastern bloc houses, they are so typical for those times. Modern buildings are also rising up now too I see.

Marleen said...

It is quite a contrast with the old city, though your photos show that the modern city are worth seeing to.

Tom said...

...new may be nice, but I enjoy the old best.

eileeninmd said...

Hello, it is interesting seeing the old and new together. Great tour and photos.

Enjoy your day and the week ahead!

Halcyon said...

I hope to get to Warsaw one of these days. Looks beautiful!

Sandra said...

I noticed in the first photo that some are modern and some are not in type of architecture. I like the shot of the bus with all the windows in front of the building with all the balcony and windows.

Revrunner said...

Had to do a double-take at that Orbis sign. I thought at first it was a giant fan. :-)

Sharon Anck said...

Such wonderful photos of this very vibrant city. That palace building is quite a sight dominating the skyline. I'm really enjoying your photos.

William Kendall said...

Wonderful examples of architecture!

PerthDailyPhoto said...

Fabulous photos here and last two posts Lois.. the mix of old and new is nicely done.. heartbreaking to think of all the wonderful old architecture destroyed in the war.

Christine said...

Thanks for the great photos & information Lois.
There is such a contrast in the styles of construction of old & new.

RedPat said...

I really knew nothing about Warsaw until reading your great posts, Lois! Thanks!

Tanya Breese said...

my gosh what a great trip you had lois...amazing photos!

David Gascoigne said...

It certainly is a contrast to the old sections of the city. It is really hard to believe that when we look back on the savagery of WWII I we are playing with the fire of starting another one. The next one, I fear, will be the end of all of us. A pox on both Trump and that little Korean Pilsbury doughboy.

Sandi said...

"After the war was over, the conquering Soviets set up a communist regime and began rebuilding the city with large housing projects and other typical buildings of an Eastern Bloc city."

Ugh.

:(

bill burke said...

What a difference between the old and new, I like the both. Looks like you had a fantastic time in Poland. Thanks for the tour Lois.

Klara S said...

I like construction of our National Stadium.