Saturday, August 27, 2011

Weekend Reflections




Continuing my tour of the Florida Historic Capitol Museum, one of the exhibits shows this "White Ladies" restroom door used in the old Whitfield Building, which housed the state Supreme Court until 1949. Jim Crow, or segregation laws, applied to almost every public activity. African Americans used "Colored Only" facilities. The second picture shows a closeup of the sign explaining segregation laws passed by Southern states after Reconstruction. Since I had a hard time not getting too many reflections in the glass protecting the exhibits (including a self portrait in the second shot), I decided to go ahead and make this part of Weekend Reflections.

16 comments:

Corker2 said...

You don't really know, but I've been reading your Posts on the Historic State Capital, but never commented. However, this one brings a memory for me.

Since I had some relation down South in Greenville, TN my Mother used to make a trip down there back in the early 50's when I was much younger. I can remember seeing signs like this on doors most everywhere. "Colored entrance in the rear" - "We do not serve Colored." - "White entrance only." - "Seating for White customers only."

I remember this stuff, but just did not fully understand why they were there, since I was so young. Now I do. Interesting Post, Lois.

Lois said...

Thanks for commenting Les. I remember these signs too from when I was little growing up in Jacksonville. What I remember most though were public water fountains which were separated and had signs saying "white" and "colored". I recently saw the movie "The Help" and it's so hard to believe how people could be so cruel.

'Tsuki said...

A shame to never forget. Thanks for sharing those picture of what has been such a sad reality in human history : it is important to remind us how inhuman we can be.

Lois Evensen said...

I remember seeing this while traveling in the South when I was a child, too. Since we lived North of the Mason-Dixon Line, my parents pointed it out to me as something terrible while it was still the norm.

Yogi♪♪♪ said...

From what I read Tulsa had the same Jim Crow type laws until the late 50's or early 60's. Not that long ago.

PerthDailyPhoto said...

It was the same in South Africa Lois, I lived in Central Africa for 16years and never went to SA once for that reason, apartheid is was a shocking thing! Like your 'self portrait' reflection!

Dave-CostaRicaDailyPhoto.com said...

My father grew up in Ohio and Michigan. When he was on the swim team at the University of Michigan in the 1930's, he travelled to Florida, his first trip south. He told me how stunned he was to see the signs of segregations.

After World War II, he was stationed by the Navy in Norfolk, Virginia. He told me that he was stunned that when he would walk down the sidewalk African Americans would step aside or bow their heads down a little, often without making eye contact, as he or other white people walked by on the sidewalk. He said it was a stunning and sad symbol of a culture of subservience that he had not seen in African Americans in Detroit.

I saw an interview with Bill Russell recently about a book regarding the experience of African Americans who migrated from the Deep South to the North during the Jim Crow era. He talked about how he had to be taught how to act around white people in school, etc., as they had such separate lives during his early childhood.

We have made a lot of progress, but have a substantial way to go.

Jack said...

An informative and important post today, Lois.

Small City Scenes said...

Interesting post, Lois. The whole capitol series is/was fascinating. Thanks. MB

biebkriebels said...

That was a sad history, but these ideas still are alive. In our country there is a rise of population thinking against immigrants, which makes me very angry. People can be so stupid in thinking one is better than an other.

Beth Niquette said...

What lovey reflections, Lois! I am praying for your family. This is a crazy time to be alive. Wow. ((hugs))

Halcyon said...

Your series reminds me a lot of the old capitol museum in Jackson. Nice self-portrait today. :)

Kaori said...

Lois, I love seeing you in the second reflection! Very cute shot :D

Kalyan said...

nice captures!

JM said...

'White Ladies'! That's shocking but I'm glad it's preserved and displayed so people will not forget.

jennyfreckles said...

Interesting post Lois. Thank goodness that eventually those iniquitous laws were repealed.