Thursday, October 22, 2009

Planter's Exchange


 
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The warehouse of the old Planter's Exchange in Havana, Florida just north of Tallahassee. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1999. The small building in the second picture sits right in front of it. Beginning in 1928, this company was the premier manufacturer of fertilizer and supplier of pesticides, agricultural and general farm supplies needed by the shade tobacco growers in all of Gadsden and Madison Counties in Florida, as well as south Grady and Decatur Counties in Georgia.

14 comments:

Cezar and Léia said...

wow really old!They could think of some restoration!
Léia

Darla said...

Love it! I could barely read your snake story!!!

Frank said...

It appears you had a great time in Havana. It looks like a must-visit old Florida town. Your grand-kids must have a had a ball. (Plus, the weather has gotten so nice.)

Beth Niquette said...

What an interesting site to be on the national registry of old places! That IS really old.

Our house was once on that registry--it was SO expensive to try to do all the restoration they required. YOu had to use original woods and the like--no metals or modern materials.

Things have loosened up a bit since we're under the local jurisdiction of our own historical preservation Commission.

Apparently the national registry is now allowing local commissions to serve in their stead.

James said...

Very cool. Old historic buildings like this are great finds.

Jacob said...

There's a building very similar to this in McIntosh...but I don't know what it was used for. So nice to see them still standing.

Don and Krise said...

I like the old "survivor" buildings that are so rich in history. Really interesting Lois.

Clueless in Boston said...

That's good that the warehouse will be protected and preserved as a bit of the agricultural history of Florida.

√ Abraham Lincoln said...

If fertilizer and pesticides were made there I would hazard a guess that the land it is on and around it is contaminated and would be on the environmental clean up fund list. I am surprised it is on the National Register of Historic Places except that it is unique to your area.

Lisa Wilson said...

How interesting! It's great that places like this can be protected.

Pam said...

Nice photos, Lois. I would like to visit that interesting old town.

Sunny said...

What an interesting place to visit. I love to read the history of other places.
Sunny :)

Bonnie Bonsai said...

That interests me! Fancy how those old things in the past are preserved with all the conditions and calamities and catastrophe the world and weather are going!

Clytie said...

True enough that there are probably chemicals in the land there, but that is still a part of history, and I'm glad it is being preserved.